Is the presupposition of naturalism in science good for the pursuit of truth?

WINTERY KNIGHT

I have a key that will unlock a puzzling mystery I have a key that will unlock a puzzling mystery

This topic came up recently in a discussion, and I wanted to be sure that all my readers were aware of how to think about the work that the presupposition of naturalism does in supporting naturalistic views of science. When I was little, way back in the 1990s, Phillip E. Johnson’s work on the definitions of science, evolution and creation were very important stuff. He was everywhere, doing lectures on university campuses and debates on the radio with Eugenie Scott. I was able to get a bunch of this audio from Access Research Network on AUDIO CASSETTES, but now that’s all obsolete.

Thankfully, I was able to find an old column written by Johnson in the Wall Street Journal, and preserved by Access Research Network.

Excerpt:

A Chinese paleontologist lectures around the world saying that recent fossil finds in…

View original post 909 more words

Guest Post: Entropy, Life and the Kingdom of God

Science and Belief

35413179611_c8f8e30945_z The Crab Nebula, a stellar explosion, a little hard to put back into an ordered state. Photo: Robert Sullivan/ Hubble – creative commons @flickr.com

That brilliant and entertaining atheist Steven Pinker has defined ‘the ultimate purpose of life, mind, and human striving: to deploy energy and information to fight back the tide of entropy and carve out refuges of beneficial order.’

That might need a bit of explaining, not least to me. Entropy is, crudely, the measure of disorder in the universe. A low-entropy state is an ordered state; high entropy is a  disordered one. Because disorder is much more likely than order, disorder (high entropy) tends to be what everything leads to.

View original post 1,072 more words

Latest #aboutme

First and foremost, I became a committed follower of Jesus Christ in 1976, previously having had ‘strong leftish/ atheistic tendencies’.I’ve been married to Jackie since September 1963. We have four [grown] children and ten grandchildren—the  latest, Faith Jemimah, born on 1/8/18. Four of the grandkids live, with their parents, in Australia. We also have two … Continue reading Latest #aboutme

Book Preview – Slaying the Dragons: Destroying myths in the history of science and faith

Science and Belief

Science as we know it stems from monotheism.

The Egyptian, Babylonian, Indian, Polynesian, Chinese, and Meso-American cultures all built up complex and sophisticated systems for making sense of the natural world as they understood it within the context of their environments. … “Nature” was not conceived of as having an independent existence, but was, rather, an expression of many fickle deities in action, and could suddenly change at the failure of a sacrifice or the omission of a ritual.

View original post 936 more words

I’m a fan of Jordan Peterson. But he conceded too much in his debate with atheist Sam Harris – Premier Christianity

Thousands of people flocked to London's O2 arena this week to watch Jordan B Peterson debate Sam Harris. Antony Aris-Osula reports on what was said, and gives his view on which side won Source: I'm a fan of Jordan Peterson. But he conceded too much in his debate with atheist Sam Harris - Premier Christianity